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america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
by coming to the united states. >> eduardo lopez, you have remarkable footage that has never been seen before in this country throughout. in a moment, we're going to el salvador to talk about what drove a lot of the migration here. where did you get it? >> many, many sources. there's a lot of footage that has never been seen, that hasn't been seen in decades. again, this is a testament to the team that created this. our editor, catherine shields, is amazing. and so is our co-director, peter getzels. i have to say about the dominican republic, i'd like to make a point that one of the main reasons we made this film is to be personified by junot diaz, who is contributing as one of our great american writers. his whole life was changed dramatically by our invasion of the dominican republic in 1965 with 23,000 marines. something that most americans know nothing about because all of this history is never taught in our schools and colleges. so for latinos, whose life is turned upside down by our own government actions and latin america that many times we are unaware of, what happens is there
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
panel would be familiar to what we have heard today. if there were talking about the united states. they would say there is a general consensus that reform is necessary on major issues. there is no general consensus. there is grave doubt as to where the system will be able to overcome to produce in the united states important reforms that will leave this country in a reformed state as opposed to hard battles that will results reforms that are ineffective. that question is paramount. it is paramount in the united states as we look at some of the same issues. having said that, despite the vast differences between mexico and the united states, we really are quite similar. there is the feeling that something new is needed. the does not seem to be a consensus on how to get there. in general terms, i think how each of the government's in l with -- governments dea the reforms will require a great deal of care. i will explain that. i think most of the people in this room understand the relationship between mexico and the united states is generally a healthy relationship. this is not always
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
. it provides opportunities for residents on either sides of the border. united states border, mexican border. when we provide that, things start falling into place. you see a reduction in crime, reduction in drug use. that's what this discussion today and we thank simon increasing for putting the fund is so important because it allows us to move forward and some of the things i think you heard and discussed, we need to increase or border infrastructure and implement a firm but fair immigration policy. we need to encourage more u.s. cities and mexican city partnerships to allow us to facilitate that trade discussed earlier. earlier in 2011, 2013, las cruces named the champion of change because we were able to show why in the southwest we've been able to increase profit and personnel in a tough and challenging time. during that time, we listened to many officials to me upon the best ration and the president said he wanted to increase trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
with the denver office of greenberg trow erring. he was the united states attorney for the district of colorado from 2006 to 2009. he's a former member of the attorney general advisory committee of the narcotics and drug trafficking subcommittee of that committee. he's an adjunct professor at the university. and he is distinguished for public service with the drug enforcement administration, the federal bureau of investigation and the secret service. he's going to help us understand law enforcement options and how to balance this power equation to get it right. michael grava, next to mihm is a professor at george mason university school of law and a visiting scholar at the american enterprise institute. the co-founder and former director for individual rights which is a public interest law firm. perhaps most on point today he is in my view probably the country's single most creative and thinker with a book on that subject called "real federalism: why it matters, how it could happen" and a very important book on the same subject published last year called "the upside down constitution." and fina
people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between two sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties with trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people and an end to safe havengs for al qaeda and its ilk. all this will continue to be our work. but make no mistake. our path is clear and we are moving forward. every day more afgha
. [inaudible] there is a lot of sacred stuff going around in the republican party. they need to be more united and they are not. the american people elected the same people over and over and over. until that stops i don't know how americans are going to move forward. another comment i wanted to make too is that, talking about the left-wing media, that is correct. there is the hannity show -- it doesn't help. >> host: robert costa his comment that there is back and forth behind the scenes that we don't know but? >> guest: the 2012 election house republicans lost a lot of seats but there was no rebellion within the caucus in the internal leadership to break with cantor, boehner or mccarthy, the top three. the only real race he saw was for conference chairman cathy mcmorris-rodgers represented from washington who ran against tom price a representative from georgia for the number four spot. cathy mcmorris-rodgers beat out prices of former chairman of the republican study committee a conservative group in the house so you saw that level the fourth ranking level some fighting. boehner kantian mccart
, and look at the state of immigration enforcement in the united states. this is about one-half of hours. >> good morning everyone, and happy new year. to those of you here with us today and those at home the winning this event. i am demetrios papademetriou, president of the immigration policy institute. i'd like to welcome you to the discussion of the institut's latest report titled, -- discussion of the institute's latest report. as you will see during the presentations and as you will conclude after the event is over, it is a formidable machinery that has been created in the united states over the past decade or decade and a half. the release of this report could not come at a more appropriate time. since the election and even before that, the president and leaders in the democratic party and the u.s. congress of both the would-both chambers of the u.s. congress, as well as key -- the democratic party and the u.s. congress -- both chambers of the u.s. congress have said this is time for a broad reform of the u.s. immigration system. we can only take them at their word. if this were to
is to unite the state of israel. >> says he will promote jewish values as well as easing the economic strain on families. another man of the moment is the former tv personality and is vying for enough votes for a possible coalition party. they are making the economy their main issue. shimon peres will decide whether to give binyamin netanyahu the first chance of forming a coalition. that is a process that took five weeks after the last election. let's talk about the situation after the election. it sounds like putting together a coalition will be tricky. >> it appears so. the last government all molested two years. then the labor party pulled out . in this case it might be even more complicated. binyamin netanyahu, if he is given the first nod, will have 28 days to form a coalition. then he has another 12 days. the question is whether some other party will be asked to put together a coalition. any kind of coalition would veer to the right. if he could do that with a minimum of cooperation would be his preference. >> thank you for reporting to us live from jerusalem. you can see our front pag
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
or the united states or anyone should have called what happened -- [inaudible] but the fact that no one actually dared any questions about the levels of polarization in venezuela, what this meant for respect for the letter, if not certainly the spirit of the constitution, on what this meant for the potential for conflict, um, was i think very sad. and worse, this is a government that is very good -- [audio difficulty] but in terms of consistently named the supreme court violating its own procedures, and it consistently now, and, you know, if it comes to an election, let me venture a guess the constitution requires the election be held within 30 days. if they were wise, they could hold it within five, still within the letter of the constitution, keep the opposition on their heels. i think what's sad is what happened on the decision of the supreme court december 9th and 10th is that there were over four million people whose voices were not heard. we're not talking about, you know, the people that were sworn in only represented roughly about 55% of the people. if chavez is the people, he's only 55%
of housing exceeds their income. and they're in the top 10% of income in the united states. that means housing is no longer accessible to the middle class. and when the middle class can't buy housing, the middle clarks as we have known it, since 1950, ceases to exist. so that's part two of the book. i've got programs that don't work, programs that do work, and then the intellectual challenge, which really took the longest period to get my head around, was, okay, if you know that these programs don't work and you've got a good fix on why, and you know these programs do work and you have a good fix on why, are you capable of developing a social program or a blueprint for a program that would work? and that turned out to be quite tricky. you would like to have -- help children. you would like to deal with social disadvantage of children, and the road block is simply not in the political wards, whether you're on the left of center, right of center, or right on the center. our government is not about to help children by directing significant social resources to their parents. so, one of the
will ask if the united states of america is, in fact, a safe bet. markets could go haywire. interest rates would spike for anybody who borrows money -- every homeowner with a mortgage, every student with a college loan, every small business owner who wants to grow and hire. it would be a self-inflicted wound on the economy. it would slow down our growth, might tip us into recession, and ironically, would probably increase our deficit. so to even entertain the idea of this happening -- of the united states of america not paying its bills -- is irresponsible. it's absurd. as the speaker said two years ago, it would be -- and i'm quoting speaker boehner now -- "a financial disaster, not only for us, but for the worldwide economy." so we've got to pay our bills. and republicans in congress have two choices here: they can act responsibly, and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly, and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be
in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the president pro tempore: the majority leader. mr. reid: would the chair announce the business for the day. the president pro tempore: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order the senate will be in a period of morning business until 1:30 p.m. for debate only, with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. durbin: mr. president? the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: after any statement by the majority leader, i'd ask consent to be recognized in morning business. the president pro tempore: without objection. mr. durbin: it is my understanding the majority leader is going to yield the floor to me at this moment. the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: mr. president, the state of nevada was admitted to the union in 1864. since 1864 there have
for the united states capitol police. my title is public information officer.s i'm an officer. the united states capitol police our responsibility in conjunction with our law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the inaugural ceremonies throughout the weekend. first and foremost, we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this historic day. with any event that occurs on the capitol complex, safety is our number one priority. that said, safety and security for guests, public, et cetera, is not carried out just by us, but in partnership with our law enforcement community, metropolitan police, united states secret service, park police and other entities as well as public safety entities. the partnership that we have established to create a pretty robust plan has been in the works for many months and while i cannot go into detail about those -- about the security plan, please know we have trained extensively to address any issues that may come up during the day. thank you. >> thank you, officer. i appreciate that. as someone that did communications before heading
and break up the united states, thereby initiating the costliest war in the country's history. abraham lincoln noted in the his first inaugural address that, quote: one section of our country believes slavery is right and ought to be extended while the other believes it is wrong b and ought to be extended -- sorry, and ought not to be extended, and this is the only substantial dispute, period. closed quote. the president of the confederate states of america, jefferson davis, reminded his congress in 1861 these are his words: the labor of african slaves was and is indispensable to our prosperity so that with interests of such overwhelming magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who r
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
to help create innovation focused jobs again in the united states. as you know all too well, madam president, our economic recovery has been slower than we would hope, although it's been steady, there are still far too many americans out of work. in my home state of delaware, more than 30,000. but we are building our way ba back. so the task before us is to think not just about an immediate economic crisis but to take a breath i think and instead focus strategically on the long-term fewer, to take -- long-term future, to take an account of what kind of economy we want to build for our children, for our grandchildren, for the america of today and tomorrow. the engine of our nation's greatest economic successes has always been innovation. from the light bulb to the search engine, american inventors and innovators, those who've taken risks and started companies, have created jobs by the thousands and changed lives by the millions. but before new ideas can scale to market and reach out to change the world, they first have to start in a lab or garage. i know from my own eight years in t
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
is that the united states government now spends more on immigration enforcement than on all other principal law enforcement agencies combined. we are spending as of fiscal year 2011, which is the most recent year for the data that we're using that was available, that's the price tag of $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 2
. during the time my parents were working in the united states, i would look at the mountain something about my parents being on the other side. >> host: where did you grow up originally? >> host: where did you grow up? >> guest: the little town in mexico that no one has heard of. but when they mention it, if you mention acapulco, people know where it is. it's about three hours away from their my father came here in 1977 and december my mother a few years later. my mother came here in 1980 when i was 4.5 years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states. >> guest: i came in 1985, in the month of may of 1985, i was nine and a half years old. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? >> guest: i have been separated from my father for about eight years. when he was sent to mexico in 1985, my family convinced him to come back here. to take us to the united states, we beg him to bring us here. we didn't want to spend any more time separated from him. i was nine under happen he thought it wouldn't be able to make across the border. because we had to run across
there are an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants here in the united states. >> yes, they broke the rules. they crossed the border illegally. >> some crossed the border illegally. they have broken the rules. >> and the overwhelming majority of these individuals aren't looking for any trouble. they're contributing members of the community. they're looking out for their families. >> the overwhelming majority of these folks are just trying to earn a living and provide for their families. >> businesses that are trying to do the right thing, that are hiring people legally, paying a decent wage, following the rules, they're the ones who suffer. they've got to compete against companies that are breaking the rules. >> this puts companies who follow the rules and americans who rightly demand the minimum wage or overtime or just a safe place to work, it puts those businesses at a disadvantage. >> first, i believe we need to stay focused on enforcement. that means continuing to strengthen security at our borders. >> first, we know the government has a threshold responsibility to secure our borders.
this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want to have a conversation about how to reduce our deficit, let's do it. we have been having that for the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need to grow this economy and put people back to work. despite that conversation and despite the election results, the position that has been taken on the part of house republicans is that we have to do it our way. if we don't, we simpl
to have details of the government's announcement. i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> venezuela's president will not be sworn in for a
in united states called burning springs because the of naturally occurring methane in the water. in pennsylvania, the first case they had of water catching on fire was in 1670. it is been happening for a while. they have had documented cases in colorado of wells catching .ire since the 20's this has caused a panic nonetheless. it does become a celebrity cause to talk about how fracking is going to mess up all the drinking water, all of our sins are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me -- sinks are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me how much money they have to put towards this propaganda. they have enough money to advertise. i do not think we ever had an exxon ad in the national review. >> >> promised land, the primary backers was uae. >> why would they want to do that? [laughter] >> protecting what they have. did not want to see the technology that we have here come see them over there. >> a lot of people do not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-suffici
to the united states, what our relationship with the middle east was. and that led to the bin ladens, a book intended to be about saudi arabia and how complicated for this generation of oil broomers to come of age in the 70s when the kingdom was awash in wealth and had to all go out and buy identities in the world, and unand one of them became a notorious terrorist do and the others moved to florida. and when i finished with that project i wanted to write about oil and american power in the post-9/11 context, and i started out -- actually the book about exxonmobil began as a book about oil and geopolitics. i wanted to essentially take the prize, the book by dany ergen that had inspired me and update it. i thought of the prize as a great work of nonfiction about the era of oil that was an era of expansion and discovery, and i wanted to write a book about global oil in the era of limits and constraintses and climates and the rest of it. so i started out on that kind of open framework and got -- thought i needed a subject, company. and once i came to that conclusion, then for an american audien
the tactical units, ambulance on stand by. neighbors reported hearing a loud boom. we aren't sure if this was a door being kickedn. most of the units pulled out by 5:45, looked like it went off without a hitch and police not commenting on the case. we are told there were no arrests made at this location and police can't fill us in on the detail because they say they don't know the outcome of any of the other raids. live from oakland. ktv channel 2news. >> all right. we get to talk act the weather because it is really, really cold outside. >> yeah. steve paulson joins us now. what helped prevent the predicted record cold? >> the north wind. >> so strange. >> it'll be colder i think on sunday morning. that looks to be the coldest but morning lows, some took a while. overnight lows 24 to 44, frost and freeze warnings out for about another hour. temperatures 29 at napa, fairfield was 26, now 30 telling me a little breeze picked up. 26 not far from livermore but oakland 41, the city 44 and 47 half moon bay with a north wind of 25 miles an hour. san jose 37, san rafael down to 34.
to these questions, the american people deserve them, including why the president of the united states after alleging in a debate with mitt romney, said that he had called it a terrorist act when in fact he hadn't. in fact that same day he did an interview with cbs news saying he didn't know what happened. probably two weeks later, he told various news programs he didn't know what was the cause of it. we knew what the cause of it was. we knew that people don't bring r.p.g.'s and mortars to spontaneous demonstrations. so we -- smor us -- some of us will not give up on this despite what some in the media think we should do until we get all the answers. i was hanging on every word you were saying, john. i happened to glance at my apps, here's a bbc news reports. -- report. it says the u.n. says numbers of syrian refugees arriving in jordan putting a considerable strain on the resources. the u.n. h.c.r. said that more than 26,500 refugees have crossed into jordan since january 1. officials said up to 3,000 were arriving every day and 50,000 were waiting to cross. that happens to be the camp that we visit
imagine if you would -- imagine among latin americans if foreign interference if it were the united states, if chavez were in the united states and nobody's seen them or talked to them or heard from them going on 40 days, and imagine the cries about american imperialism that we would hear, but we have that exact six chelation and it's not in the u.s. is actually cuba and they're kind of an unknown factor in all of this and in an economic why. >> charles, with that in mind if he were back in the state department, and you're not, so what would you be advising the folks to do in terms of the u.s. government cracks how do you, or a foreign government for that matter in terms of what are some positive things that could be done to advance the issues in a sustainable way and no telling putting it in very and vigorous terms that you could translate according to your own thoughts, but what could or should we be doing in the international community? >> that was actually next on my list of things if you didn't raise it i was going to say we didn't talk about this. and sort of go to the checklist. fir
racked up. if congress refuses to give united states the ability to pay its bills on time, consequences for the entire global economy could be catastrophic. the last of congress threatened this course of action, our entire economy suffered. i congratulate the newly sworn in members of congress. i look forward to working with the new congress and a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interests of our country above the interests of the party, am convinced we can cut spending and raise revenue in a manner that reduces our deficit and protect the middle class. and we can step up to me the important business that awaits us this year, creating jobs -- to the important business that awaits us this year, creating jobs. protecting our planet from harmful effects of climate change. educating our children, shielding them from the horrors of gun violence. these are things we must do. in this new year, i will fight as hard as i know how to get them done. happy new year, everybody. >> i am congressman dave camp. let me be candid. and anderson and the frustration so many americans have with washington
in mind if they are very concentrated and very sedentary. 10% of all people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle-class, middle-age people in rural areas and hold onto their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaging crying our teens and young adults in most criminal careers are short. one of things that means if there's a new generation of young people trying to solve the problem fresh and getting their hands on guns and one way you could take about the challenge here, the situation here is if you think about the united states being like a giant bathtub with 300 million guns, but nothing to worry about the entire town. just a few million guns changing hands every year and trying to divert them away from the high risk. the other thing i like to mention that the conversation right now is a bunch of stuff going on the federal level and a bunch of states to innovate on their own. one of the things important to keep in mind the slow side from hawaii, no state is an island. every state is doing on the gun regulations that is relevant in
is still nothing more than a unit of communication. but the -- so i really started looking into this. did a lot of, you know, research, a lot of looking into the presidents. and the storyline in this, it's an a to z book, so you can go and dip in as you see fit. some of the stuff is funny, some not so funny. but really what the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and of what this country was, there's a letter that's written between benjamin franklin and noah webster, the dictionary maker, in which they talk about acts of resistance, acts of rebellion, acts of response to the british. and they're talking, they use various words to talk about it, but they're really sort of american acts to sort of identify who we are as a people. and what are involved in these acts? one of the acts is public libraries. benjamin franklin has come to this country, his father's come to this country smuggling a bible, smuggling a bible into the seat of a chair and tells benjamin at one point that one of the things, most important thing
the only finding themselves in the red. bank of america also turning down in the month. disney and united technologies both up better than 9%. and hewlett-packard having the best january up 20%. likely on sympathy for a possible dell deal. because h. rks is actually the worst performing dow component in the last ten months. tough times for all of teches. intel and microsoft also seeing big declines. and home depot riding the housing market. and bank of america lifted by financial sentiment. bank of america though, the worst performer since the 2007 rally. down 78% since then. alcoa down almost as much app and hp down 67%. the biggest winner again home depot. ibm and mcdonald's also up more than 60% since 2007. >> which dow 30 stock should you buy today that will be the big winners? joining me with their picks are harry clark and peter taus. good to see you guys. what kind of a move, harry, do you think the dow makes in the next five to six years? >> earlier today jpmorgan strategists had 20,000 for the dell in four years. i think that's entirely possible. we could be at 15,000 this year.
. united nations secretary general said the fund raising goal had been exceeded. >> representatives from nearly 60 countries met in kuwait to examine how to help with the millions of people who have fled the fighting within syria and the 700,000 who are refugees in neighboring countries. the french military advance against islamist fighters in northern mali continues to make rapid progress. emma the troops have taken control of the airport over the weekend. virtually unopposed, the -- two other cities of the weekend. the french are now negotiating with tuareg rebels, who say they have control. >> onto economic news, and financial markets have been on the rise these past few weeks as hopes have grown that the worst of the year of crisis has passed. today in spain, there's a reminder that things are very bad still for millions of people. revenue figures show spain sank even deeper into recession in the final quarter of last year with the economy contracting faster than ever. more than one in four spaniards are already out of a job, and new figures suggest that unemployment could get even w
. by executive order of the president of united states, when a criminal commits such a crime as children being slaughtered, those criminals need to be put in the gas chamber within 30 calendar days of their conviction. we nee to start treating murderers like murderers and quit changing the gun-control laws. w 98% of. ho are in compliance with -- 98% of americans are in compliance with gun-control laws. so you put the person in the gas chamber within 30 days. there's the answer. we need good leadership and the white house such as john mccain for president. we would not have these problems. put the murderers in the gas chamber. there's your answer. have a great day. host: a tweet -- the chairman of the judiciary committee in the senator patrick leahy. here's a little bit of him from yesterday. [video clip] >> let's make it easier. talk about gun shows. should we have mandatory background checks at gun shows for the sale of weapons? >> if you are diller, that is already the law. >> that's not my question. please, i'm not trying to place questions, mr. lapierre. >> senator, i do not believe the wa
as president of the united states and moving into the white house but what if you had to buy the white house, to live there? your hopes might be dashed right now. u.s. home prices have risen for nine straight months the most recent home price index posted its largest increase since 2006. how much would it cost to buy one of the most glamorous, is horrific homes in our nation? real estate web company, zillow, estimates that 1600 pennsylvania avenue in washington, d.c. has a current value of $294.9 million. $294.9 million. so president obama and his family first moved into that home in january of 2009, the white house's value has risen 7% from $275.6 million. so put your checkbooks away. >>> let's say you are not in the market to buy a house. instead you're looking to make money on the housing market? and what we're hearing about the housing recovery, where should you be looking? we have angel capital cofounder and cio joins me in a fox business exclusive. i want to talk about your fund. the ticker is angls. it is an income fund of up over 23% in the past year. the majority of your fund is non
oil companies in the united states. they are here because they don't get those kind of benefits in norway or sweden. i get gas royalties out of ohio from a french company. they get 30% they don't even pay tax on. we have to run a country. i think simpson-bowles is the right direction, but i don't think simpson-bowles goes far enough. at one time i thought steve forbes' idea was great, but he wants to keep a certain piece of money that is an entitlement. guest: and makes a very good point that we have got to have the kind of pro-growth tax reform that simplifies the system, broadens the base, lower rates, but that stimulates economic growth and economic development. that means not only getting people back to work but it is the growing economy that creates more revenue, not higher taxes. the growth and the revenues from growth is what we really need to address the deposition and debt. often we don't focus on that enough in the scoring, like the cbo, congressional budget office scoring you see all the time, the revenue from growth is not factored in. in anything we put together a,
on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during the obama administration, 1.5 million. for the entirity of the bush administration, two terms in office, we saw about two million deportations. and then in 2012 alone, nearly -- more than, rather, 400,000 immigrants deported, which is a record high. our next phone call is from mark in new jersey, republican. hi, mark. caller: good morning. i'm also a municipal chair here for the republican committee. i'm al
we agree that it is critical that the united states remain fully engaged, that we project not only the power of our military strength when necessary but the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and new demands we will inevitably face. there is no doubt you will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. before i recognize senator corker, let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done through your long and illustrious career here in the senate and in the chairman ship of this committee and in anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and god speed to many of the journeys that lie ahead and we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me now recognize senator corker, the ranking member, for his comments. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. i thank our three distinguished guests who are going to introduce the chairman in just a minute. i want to say to the chairman, i want t
a unit of communication. so i really started looking at a lot of research and looking into the presidents. the storyline in this is an abc book so some of the stuff is funny and some of it's not so funny. really the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back in the beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and of what this country was there is a letter that is written between benjamin franklin and noah webster the dictionary maker in which they talk about acts of resistancresistanc e, acts of rebellion, acts of response to the british and they are using various words to talk about it but they are really american asked to identify who we are as a people. and one of the acts is a public library. franklin has -- and his father come to this country smuggling of bible and tells benjamin at one point that one of the most important things you should use as a printer. this is the idea that when england at that time when his father came over when the franklins came over in england there were two printing presses one in oxford and one in london. franklin was very interested in
're getting united and saying we are going to do this. from the political side, we elected these people. we had a huge turnout in arizona, a door-to-door -- the turnout was more than ever before. not only is it from the after the side of having these visuals, but it is from the organizing side that we have the vote as well. >> thank you all for being with us from phoenix grid jose, especially, you are 11 years old, that you fought so hard for your dad to be freed, senior on all of the television networks, you are very great -- seeing you on all of the television networks, you are very brave. thank you so much for being with us. we will continue this discussion about immigration when we come back. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. we continue to look at immigration now, as we turn to news this week that president obama will kick off a second term with a major push for comprehensive immigration reform. obama made the announcement during a speech tuesday in nevada, a battleground states w
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